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CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:25pm EST
federal housing administration. mrs. galante in her role as acting f.a.a. commissioner has failed, mr. president, to take serious actions to shore up the solvensolvency and prevent a tar bailout of the federal housing streasmghts the latest actuarial report shows that f.h.a. has a negative economic value and a taxpayer bailout is most likely. despite these warnings, f.h.a. waited until april of 2012 to raise additional premiums and secretary donovan, secretary of h.u.d., has testified to the senate banking committee that it will wait until next year to increase premiums by a meager 10 basis points. despite having statutory authority to do more to protect the taxpayers. ms. gallon lay tai has deathed the true -- ms. galante has denied the true severity of the problems. last year she said, "there's no evidence or widespread prediction that home prices are going to decline to the kind of levels that would require a bailout." really? yet, although some prices have risen slightly, the f.h.a.'s financial position continues to deteriorate. several experts now conclude that a taxpayer bail ou
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
oral tradition and several jennings direct descendants are in the audience today. knocked mrs. alexander. she died year-and-a-half after i got to know her. she was by far the last survivor of that generation. her father, her grandfather, paul's son franklin lived to be 90 and she spent a lot of her growing up years in her grandparents's home. so she was able to hear these family stories from the 's mouths. her own father was a slave and her grandfather was a slave until age 20 himself. this is rare in 2008 when i met her and she had this likeness of paul jennings on her living-room wall. very rare to be able to debrief the slave descendant whose family stories do go back to slavery days. getting to know all of the descendantss but especially sylvia jennings alexander, very much informed my story and enriched my life. i interpret paul jennings's story as a deliberate, courageous and successful pursuit of that most american of promises, the right to rise. after jennings had worked for webster for several years he got himself a low level but steady job working for a government ag
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 11:00pm EST
cosponsored with her delegation members both in the house and senate. >> thank you, mr. king. >> bantam chairwoman, thank you very much. i want to thank you for the opportunity to be with you today. we'd also like to thank our home state senators, chuck schumer and kirsten gillibrand who have truly been great advocates for new york state and our country. my name is kevin law, president and ceo of the long island association, which is a business organization in the metropolitan region. for those not familiar, long island is a long island. it goes from brooklyn to montana point, but it's politically part of new york city, so the long island i'm referring to his nassau and suffolk county. we are america's first-ever cover region of 3 million people under the home of the middle class and the middle class is built on our small businesses. the long island economy is made up of 100,000 businesses in 90% of those businesses have 20 employees or less in that small businesses are clearly the back bone of the long island economy. superstorm sandy had a devastating impact to long island including h
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 9:00pm EST
patient of mine that i was assigned to follow. her name was mrs. banks and she is in the opening of the book. she really didn't want anything done for her cancer that had spread all over. the doctors clearly wanted to do something. if they essentially bullied her or talked her into it. the benefit and understated the risk, something we know from the research happens especially the dozens of us that do procedures it just didn't seem right to me. it seemed it seems to professional have long strained from his original mission and its heritage where i met david -- >> host: let me just interrupt. you were in medical school and you decided you had enough and you went to the school of public health? >> guest: they tore me upside down for explaining to them she didn't want the procedure done. it didn't matter what she wants. this is what she needs, and this is to me the sign of a culture that i had absorbed from the outside but didn't want to be part of, so i quit medical school and then i started graduate school for public health because i heard of a track on quality and there were people
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 9:00pm EST
arthur goes on trial in december of 18 pay. -- 35 he is egger to win a conviction. by this time mrs. thorton is going forward and come to the defense of her alleged assail i can't and says in the trial at arthur never lifted the ax she never believed he intended to hurt her she felt safe in his presence. he was just -- and she wanted the it to go away. and he did this and this and managed to get ore people to override the testimony. so arthur is convicted. there's only one punishment for that which is the death penalty. and so arthur bowen goes on to death row, and? january of 1836, is sentenced to death. and with the clock ticking, mrs. thorton does something even more -- it was amazing snuff enough she had testified on arthur's behalf on criminal trial. she starts out recruiting her friends in high society and she was very prominent woman. many prominent friend, easy access to the leadership of the country. she weptd to the vice president van buren and said use your good officings with the president jackson, tell him he should pardon arthur, you know. his mother is very good and,
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
have to do share that someone special to me, my wife. i will see her later today. and to mr. inside, thank you for joining us. i listen to other comments today and i can't disagree with your comment, but the one thing we all have to look to, especially in a time of why we are here, none of you who claim to be here. we are here debating a fiscal cliff. we're here debating direction of america, we were going to go financially. very responsible ability as members of congress. we are the stewards of public funding. it's rightfully have this hearing again and i vitiated. in december when i came, at least a couple issues. we want to invest in infrastructure. one america to move quickly in the best ways possible. what you want from you also need a plan for her. if the networks, a planned test it, it's an audited in a plan that has a review. i happen to come from california. the happiness in the area and many of you talk about. it's part of where it began. i have ruled out of viability, cost and with them and come in this will ever that is why i joined the chairman, mr. denham, mr. miller a
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 7:00pm EST
her first real bill that she handled on the floor as chairman of the appropriations committee. mr. president, on roll call vote 248, i voted "no." it was my intention to vote "aye." therefore, i ask unanimous consent that i be permitted to change my vote since it will not affect the outcome. the presiding officer: is there an objection? without objection. mr. pryor: i yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the senate stands adjourned until 1:00 p.m. stands adjourned until 1:00 p.m. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors of many area embracing investigative reporting. but the point is seen number theory says it's not just economics. if the discomfort investigative reporting causes in a newsroom because it's troublesome. it's that for an economics. if you ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful, get it people running into complaint to the editor. we were very fortunate not to 70s and almost all her career's to work for people who were really strong and upgrade in that area and let the chips fall where they may. >> now on booktv, fairness 17th ann
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 11:00pm EST
homeschooled, and listen while providing mr. inhofe if oklahoma who home schools her kids and fears that somehow this convention would hand the power to an unelected group of international bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children and oklahoma. .. if you know what i do and you you. thank you. >> i welcome senator from iowa. >> it has been inspirational to watch them work together in a bipartisan fashion and to bring us to this point. i just hope that you we do not lose that in terms of the vote. i just came over from the dirksen building where we had a wonderful building honoring bob dole. mr. president, some time ago, i went back and i read senator dole's speech on the senate floor. april 14, 1969. mr. president, i would ask that it be included in my remarks that this speech be printed in the record. >> without objection. >> he spoke of the future. of people with disabilities in america. and what we needed to do to change our society. that was 1969, it is 21 years later when we passed the americans with disabilities act. the country has changed so much for the better because
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00am EST
, barack obama the story, but to be traveled to kenya with mr. marinus. we did a lot of taping over there, so you can see all of that in the special we did on her website, booktv.org. use the search function in the upper left hand corner watch some of the footage. it was quite a trip to kenya to see that background. yes, sir. >> guest: one of the great person is reporting reporting was he deconstruct it obama's memoir, faith of our fathers. dreams from our fathers. i think i got john mccain -- i had the fathers part right. which he wrote and 95 or so. 95 or 96. marinus went back to less accurate in the book, so it's a great companion to read if you read obama's memoir. >> host: there's some publishers, sentinel cognitive umt, that put out a budget anti, david limbaugh the great destroyer, i am the change and do nice to see obama's america are quite critical of president obama. trained to commit to these sell well? >> guest: they do because they serve right your wrong light as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy and another results have a very active audience in a president obam
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:45pm EST
. john, thank you for your work. [applause] i hope all of you will join me and keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she's a remarkable woman who spent a lifetime serving this country and we all cherish her as she continued to play a role at the library. i could come here and not mention nancy for at least a moment. i also want to say, governor, it's great to be back with you. we did a lot of things over the years have been mayor of san diego to u.s. senator, to governor to a leader and a variety of ways. and the tequila scrape people who represent a willingness to serve their state in an important way. it's always engaged when you rub there. thank you poker serving the country. it really does make a difference. it's great to be back here. [applause] i did maybe with us, but were thrilled to have you. we have an american legacy book tour. our very fond of the library as you know someone made a movie called ronald reagan and i want to recognize tonight kevin knobloch and his wife randi. or i was thrilled to be a cabin because such a great job. so we come back to the reagan library from
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 10:00pm EST
favorite one now? >> the one that we used to go to mrs. then san francisco where one of my daughters' lives. they closed but she found another one and the name might cannot remember but it is on the main drag right before her city hall i will think of the name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i enjoyed your book american stories i a understand only basically they were derived from newspaper headlines? >> from going to wherever i was in reporting the story. newspaper headlines maybe that is how i found out about them? >> there must have an idea is you pursued that did not turn into a story. were there any that came out of the process? >> i went to a place because somebody phone to me or wrote to me a letter i usually ended up with that story. almost always been just about everything is in their better or worse. >> do you have any insight with u.s. providence -- president has of preference for a dog as a family pet? [laughter] maybe they never met a cat that they like. [applause] more questions? >> as a little christmas gift could you give us the recita
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 2:00am EST
promotion a call from the east of england, ms. micaela philpott. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. every debate is not the question. the question is a good piece of paper decided to marriage. a question of and equality. i have this friend and her parents got together about 20 years now. one of them is great at cooking and awful at directions. the couple followed by cnn ryan aren't allowed to get married. the official definition is formal union of a man and a woman, physically recognized by law which they become husband-and-wife. but. but why today's society, and accepting society sisto richart between men and women? people have partnerships and are not allowed to be asserted as has been our wife and although marriage isn't for everyone, shouldn't it be something everyone can decide to? how could she feel if you couldn't bear the person you love? the first is not driven in 2001 in the last, argentina 2010. 10 countries in 11 years isn't that exciting. love is the natural human emotion. why should the of the person you love change anything? why should we let authority to take her so
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 9:00am EST
presiding, mr. president, while senator inhofe spoke about his youngest daughter who home-schools her kids. their fear that this could hand the power to an unelected group of bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children in oklahoma, and i heard senator lee of utah add to that negative chorus, a question -- he said, i have justifiable doubts that a u.n. committee in geneva can judge the best interests of children in utah. i agree. and this convention does nothing to empower an international convention of bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children in delaware, in west virginia, in indiana, or in massachusetts. and i am frankly upset, mr. president, that they have succeeded in scaring the parents who home school their children all over this country. my own office has the goen dozens of calls and lowers demanding that i vote against this convention as a mast international law and as a matter of u.s. law, this convention does nothing -- does nothing -- to change the home schooling of children in america. rather, it does something positive. the americans with disabilities act, led so bri
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 11:00am EST
she met mr. wrong and for have a year they had relationship but he didn't get along with her daughter, didn't give him the ok and that led to strain and as he was going out the door, by mutual agreement, he said i am going back on match.com and find someone just like you. and she thought wait a minute. he thinks there is a facsimile of me out there, that i am like a box of cereal. he has to go back -- to dial 7 and pull out someone just like me. so she felt -- okay, she was using this market rhetoric as an orientation to help her get to a human intimate life goal but that this guy had actually gone gold way and was seeing her in a market like way. and she said no, she recoiled, she drew the line. that is alienated. by drawing a line where she is basically doing is saying one side of this line, i will be the emotionally caring, i will be emotionally engaged, i will be attached emotionally to those around me. on the other side of the line i will be detached. nothing wrong with the attachment in its context. the market is a brilliant invention actually and we don't want to sit down and h
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:30pm EST
the end of the summer pickup were to carson and her asian was not going to publish the chapter. they were going to publish township tours. the effect that was enormous. before this year by mrs. published as a book, he was destined to be a bestseller, which it did and it turned carson immediately into a household name and as i said earlier, one of the most famous writers in america. the sea around us was number one on "the new york times" bestseller list for 39 straight weeks. it was on the bestsellers list for several years interesting at the time of the top 10, her publisher decided to reissue the earlier book from 1841 called under the sea wind, the one that disappeared without a trace it onto the bestseller lists for a period of time, rachel carson had two of the top 10 books in america at the same time on the bestseller list. the sea around us from the national book award, which is in its infancy at the time. the second or third time it has been awarded yet this is a picture at the awards banquet with the other winners that year. on the far left is mary ann moore to run for
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 8:00pm EST
birthday of civil rights icon rosa parks and commemorating her legacy. the presiding officer: without objection the committee is discharged and the senate will proceed to the measure. mr. merkley: i ask unanimous consent the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table with no intervening action or debate and any statements be placed in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. merkley: mr. president, i ask senator webb be added as a cosponsor. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. merkley: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the consideration of senate resolution 625 submitted earlier today. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. res. 625 recognizing the january 12, 2013 opening of the united states freedom pavilion and so forth. the presiding officer: without objection the senate will proceed to the measure. mr. merkley: i ask unanimous consent the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table with no intervening a
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
figure his or her route properly. >> host: we are talking with andrew blum, the author of "tubes" the journey to the center of the internet and the staff wired -- staff writer at "wired" magazine. mr. blum you described a company as an internet backbone company. what is that? >> guest: they own very large physical pieces of the internet. they operate on a global network meaning, they have rights, strands of glass alongside a road or a railroad track and more importantly, they then owned this optical equipment that illuminates the fibers that transmit the data. and they sell that to anyone who is interested. it could be another network. it could be a large government organization and the government is level 3 major customer about what they are doing is essentially, they are the ones who are allowing the internet to the global. they're the ones making a long-distance the long-distance connections and they're the base layer that allows all of the other more familiar network names that everybody knows, the facebook's in the googles to write on top of that. >> host: andrew blum, if someone
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 5:00pm EST
progressive steps she took. i listened to her and i believe that's the kind of leadership that can help us continue down this path. >> senator hagan. >> thank you, mr. chairman. mr. secretary, thank you for your testimony today. i know that senator corker asked about reverse mortgages and i am concerned about that issue and i'm particularly concerned that $2.8 billion of the 16 billion economic shortfall are related to the program. can you talk more about why these classes on the reverse mortgage program? >> here's the fundamental problem without getting into too much of the history. at one point when fannie mae was issuing these phones, they were generally variable rate they allowed a borrower to basically draw on it over time the amount of money they need. as that program has switched to being a chimney may program, there is basically no option for those borrowers to do anything to try the full amount. >> why? >> because we don't have the statutory authority to be able to make the changes that would allow us to limit the draw up front. that is the change we are asking that we mak
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated woman. what if washington letters have become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? but just petraeus' e-mails became public and what if we got rid of george washington? bill clinton is not the first and not the worst in petraeus is not the first for the worse. in there ,-com,-com ma done that and there's a long history in infected pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited a prostitute. i know, say it isn't so, right? but it happened. the details are sketchy and there's not a lot of letters written about this but here is what we can piece together. lincoln's best friend was joshua. >> speed and speed was as dashing and handsome and quote unquote lucky with the ladies as lincoln was unlucky and awkward and romance. speed felt sorry for lincoln in the eyes called each other by their last names, speed them again and speed invited lincoln to work in his general store and he didn't have a place to say so he let speed stay in the general store. during the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30am EST
her use of mrs. nixon's recently released private documents. this is just under 50 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul and i'm the acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing author talk recitations. today, we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who is by the way of warren 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, did much who did much of her research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas and san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement and she has written to date, three different books those being turning right at the 60's, conservator capture of the gop, wives, mothers and the conservative women conservative women in the crusade against communism and of course the book we love the most around here which is "pat nixon" embattled first lady. her book is an outstanding work and i look forward to -- i would like you to help me welcome her out onto the stage talk about her work. m
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 12:00pm EST
attempting to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course kay has also worked to reduce the marriage penalty tax. she's been a strong defender of taxpayer interests and her efforts have made the tax code less hostile to saving and to families. she alluded to her great work with nasa. she's one of the senate's leading supporters of nasa and human space flight, and of course gnaws i nasa has contribd historic technological breakthroughs that have benefited all americans. kay appreciated the importance of basic scientific research to long-term american prosperity and she appreciates the role that nasa has played in fostering innovation. she's long said and advocat
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am EST
her people and i am happy to report we have not. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the senator from california, the hon. dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, nancy pelosi, mrs. bush, harry reid, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years i have followed tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988 she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma creating the lead for democracy, elections followed in 1990 when her party won 80% but that joy turned to tragedy and the the military junta and aung san suu kyi spent 3 decades under house arrest unable to visit her dying husband. in 1996 i recall senator bill cohen approaching with senator mccain to sponsor a burma sanction bill, sanctions were put in place in 1997 and only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates and we continue to work on behalf of the people of burma. in 2003 following an assassination attempt s
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 12:00pm EST
that i was assigned to follow. her name is mrs. banks and she's in the opening of the book. she didn't want anything done for her cancer, which had spread all over. the doctors clearly wanted to do something. they essentially bullied her or talked her into it. they overstated the benefits and under siege at the risk, something we know from research happens, especially those of us who do procedures it just didn't seem right to me. it seemed as if profession wasn't telling the truth. he seemed medicine have long straight from its original mission and heritage. it's not why it went into medicine and i quite frankly quick. i started school where i met david-based evolution money. >> host: i'm sorry to interrupt. you are an medical school and you had enough and the two school public health? >> guest: i explained it at the morning conference. it turned me upside down for exciting to them she didn't want the procedure done. they basically implied it didn't matter what she wants. this is what she needed. this was to me definable culture that i observed from the outside but didn't want to be a
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 12:00pm EST
senator scout brown. mr. president, in her marvelous book entitled "american heroines: the spirited women who shaped our country," senator kay bailey hutchison wrote the following: "no history can be written appropriately without acknowledging the part women have played in building the greatness of our country. end quote. as my valued colleague and good friend begins a new chapter in her life, i hope that she finds the time to add a new chapter to her own book, one that will be fascinating, inspiring, and auto biographical. like the women that kay celebrates, says an author from amelia earheart, from sally barton to condoleezza rice, kay bailey hutchison is a pioneer, a breaker of barriers. in the special election of 1993, the people of texas made her the first woman to represent them in the united states senate. in the three regular elections since then, they have confirmed their trust in her by ever increasing margins. as the leader of the senate commerce committee, kay has been a strong voice for transportation systems, better, efficient, safe and secure. in my own work on the homeland
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 12:00am EST
experience with patient of mine that i was assigned to follow. her name was mrs. bank and she is in the opening of the book. she really didn't want anything done for her cancer, which had spread all over. the doctors clearly wanted to do something. they essentially bullied her or talked her into it. they overstated the benefits and understated the risk, something we know from research happens-especially'll those that do procedures. is just didn't seem right to me. it seemed as if this profession wasn't telling the truth. it seemed as if the profession ol' medicine has long trade from its original mission and heritage. it's not why i went into medicine, and i, quite frankly, quit. i started school at public health where i met david bates. >> host: you were in medical school and you decided you had had enough and you went to school of public health? >> guest: yeah. i basically explained what mrs. banks wanted at our morning con fresh. they tore me upside-down for explaining to them that she didn't want the procedure done. they basically implied, didn't matter what she wantses. this is wha
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2012 7:00pm EST
farewell speech by simply saying thank you all. i have a lot to be grateful for her. but mr. president, pna senator and since this is my farewell speech, i do have a few more things i'd like to say. i am leaving the senate at a moment in our history when america faces daunting challenges, both domestic and foreign and went too often our problems seem greater than our government's ability to solve them. but i can tell you that i remained deeply optimistic about america's future and constantly inspired by the special destiny but i'm convinced is ours as american. my hot medicine is based not in theory or hope, but in american history and in personal experience. i think particularly about my time in public life and especially the changes i've witnessed since i took the oath of office as a senator on january 3rd company and 89. the fact is over the past quarter century, america and the world have become freer and more prosperous. the iron curtain was peacefully torn down of the soviet empire defeated. the eternal values of freedom and opportunity in which america was founded and for which
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 1:30pm EST
look forward to working with my colleagues. the presiding officer: the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: may i thank the senator from maryland, as always, for her usual courtesy and i think she had a very important message and i appreciate not only the words themselves but her eloquence and passion. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the senator from south carolina be included in a colloquy during my remarks. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i, like i believe all of us just finished watching the president's remarks at -- i guess it was the executive office building. and i'm not sure yet as i sort out my impressions of the president's remarks as to whether to be angry or to be saddened. i've been around this town for a number of years, and as is well known, i had an interest in the presidency more than academic and i've watched a lot of presidents, going back to president reagan from the standpoint of a member of congress. and i've watched these other crises as we go through them, whether it be the potential shutdown of the government
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 11:00pm EST
opportunity to share the findings. >> thank you for her testimony. and now mr. prendergast. >> thank you for your extraordinary commitment to the people of the congo. deeply appreciated by everyone in this room. i want to begin by echoing something you said, congressman smith, earlier in the hearing. no one is questioning the hard work and dedication in decades of long commitment to key administration officials have exhibited on behalf of peace and congo. i would particularly point out for special accommodation ambassador johnny carson and susan rice, particularly saddened by personal attacks against ambassador raised seer over the last couple weeks over issues related to the congo. it has been fully activated and some people see blood in the water, but knowing john and susan for the past 16 years i can tell you from personal experience that worked tirelessly for peace. reasonable people can disagree over type takes and strategies and it's in that spirit i deliver my testimony today. i'm going to focus remarks and issues related to the congolese peace process and division of labor marks
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
. cochran: mr. president, we wish to thank the distinguished manager of the bill for her courtesies and for her skill in managing this bill. her sensitivity to the need for improvements and sustaining the disaster assistance capabilities of our great country. thank you. mr. paul: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kentucky. mr. paul: i ask unanimous consent to call up amendments 3376 and 3410 en bloc. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendments. the clerk: the senator from kentucky, mr. paul, proposes amendment numbered 3376 and 3410 en bloc. mr. paul: mr. president, when hurricane sandy struck, hundreds -- when hurricane sandy struck the northeast, hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people were without power. we all saw the video footage, we saw the terrible trauma and people are still trying to dig out from underneath the debris of hurricane sandy. during that period of time, hundreds of workers drove up from the south wanting to help. these workers were nonunionized and they were turned away. this was a sad day for our country that nonun
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 7:30am EST
united states senate, i present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband because she gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. he received his medal of honor to his wife and pearl harbor. .. he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. now his style was one of absolute stability. he was the one who believed that believe that the decorum of the senate enabled the senate to do the peoples business. he was the essence of stability and he showed that often good manners was good politics that led to good politics. he did not argue the loudest and instead he worked diligently. he marshaled his arguments and with quiet determination he won the day. has a former appropriator i saw that he really got through the air marks. he loved in mark's and what did he do with those earmarks? i can tell you. he made sure that we looked after indian tribes. he made sure we looked after the poorest of the poor in hawaii. his superfund site that had been left by his legacy and
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
out. in one of her diaries, it says, one day, 'spoke to p. about mrs. r.,' and that's the last mention of mrs. r. in mrs. morgan's diaries. so i think that was a fairly dramatic moment. he then had to kind of keep it more secret, and he was not--it's interesting, he was--he lived very--he was much more of a european than an american puritan about all this. the european aristocrats had mistresses. they would travel to other friends' country houses, they would stay in european hotels. they trusted their friends not to talk. it was sort of accepted, especially in the prince of wales' set. he had these women with him, he traveled, and everybody knew about it, and nobody really talked about it. and i think morgan sort of did more or less the same thing. but once his wife found out, it was a problem. and the other problem was that this mrs. randolph was relatively young and not wealthy and she needed a husband, and morgan was not going to get divorced. so a rather convenient solution came along. another prominent american man of their world was william c. whitney, who had been secret
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 7:00pm EST
ascribed to make this the coming edge institution that it is. we really can do without her leadership and support. also, my colleague, mr. tom mcnaught. the work that we have done to not be possible without him. but after the assassination, the taping was dismantled. and everyone said that the secretary mood of the executive office building. the tapes went to a variety of storage locations. robert kennedy actually used them for his book, "thirteen days". there is the reel to reel tapes and the dictaphone. 1983 so we have the first opening, and it is really a fact that the system was actually installed and 62, and 2012, we open and declassify the very last tape. but the entire collection is now open. this book that he had worked on is was the first one to include all of the tapes. >> and if one of these fine people want to go browsing, where would they go? they would go here. >> that's right. people can go to her digital archives now uncertain. on the educational portion of our website, we have a whole website where they come to life and you get to do activities on him. you can actuall
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 9:00am EST
present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband. our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. though gentle in style, he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of the sirens at pearl harbor, volunteering to serve his country, putting aside his own dreams to be a physician. but he went on to be a healer of many wounds. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his fellow soldiers. my experience with senator inouye as a friend was that he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage ever to be elected to the senate. imagine. he himself knew what it was like to break barriers and to break boundaries. when he came to the senate, he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought tirelessly to improve their lives. now his style was one of absolute civility. he was the one who believed that the decorum
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 5:00pm EST
stabenow from michigan. i thank her so much for working so well and hard on this. ms. stabenow: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you very much. i first want to thank senator merkley who has been tireless in bringing forward the issues of the farmers and ranchers in oregon and to my colleagues who are here on the floor from new york and new jersey. i had the opportunity to be in new jersey with senator menendez and to see firsthand also with senator landrieu and senator tester, and it's very, very clear that this is a horrific situation and deserves our attention and support. what we are doing with this amendment, as modified -- i want to thank senator blunt for working with us in cosponsoring the amendment stk-rbs to basically -- is to basically take what we have done and passed in the farm bill and putting it into this very, very important disaster assistance bill. in the spring we experienced late freezes that wiped out many fruit crops in a number of states, including michigan, new york and pennsylvania. in my home state we had
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
yousef in the white house. johnson says no. i am not leaving until mrs. kennedy leaves with me. so we can get her back to washington. won't leave without her husband's body. johnson's as we go to the plane and wait for her and the body there. calm and decisive as if he thought everything through in a moment, that scene on the plane when he gets to the plane also haven't been described from his point of view. we all know the photograph, lyndon johnson standing with his hand up, jacqueline kennedy standing next to him, ladybird on the other side, the judge with the bible administering the oath. it hadn't been told from johnson's point of view and i wanted to do that so for the -- to do that i will talk to everyone who is alive and who was in that room. i talked to mary famer who was johnson's secretary. if you look at that iconic photograph, in the back behind the people you see the top of the young woman sort of curly black head, that is a marie famer's head. what she is doing she told me is checking that johnson takes the oath of office, she is checking to make sure that the words are
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 10:00pm EST
intelligence newspaper company and says mr. jefferson nine sorry i'm late. and her head explodes because this is supposed to be the embodiment of everything that is wrong in american life, and she just found him to be the most gracious man she had ever met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic and the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone is going to tell him who voted. maybe he is already starting on the next one. but i want to talk a little bit -- jefferson the politician, jefferson the renaissance man, jefferson the symbol, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, franklin roosevelt wanted him for the new deal and world war ii, he's like winston churchill in the bible he can be used in any way that you need partly because he was so articulate and so proliferate. 20,000 or more letters. brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquent. so what can we make of it? this is the man, the human being we have, an
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
a both socially adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. monroe hated it, absolutely hated it. >> she warned her husband, you can't rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down and i think it was a little too fast, not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> is probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies. they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir, i, myself, never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. now you stop and think about how much power that is, it's a lot of power. >> prior to this battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and made it possible for countless people to survive and to flourish as a result. i don't know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just you can walking around the white house ground
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 12:00pm EST
to health care and justice has made chicago a healthier, better city and we are all in her debt. mr. president, i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. durbin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: i ask consent the quorum call be suspend. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: and to speak in morning business. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. dush in: mr. president, every week i flare -- mr. durbin: mr. president, every week i hear from students around the nation who are struggling with student loans. congress has enacted on important legislation to help students with these loans, like keeping the interest rate of federal subsidized student loans at a low 3.4%. but we need to do more. for borrowers and their families. because these private student loans -- private student loans -- have become burdensome and unmanageable. while other types of consumer loan debt are decreasing, there is one category that is increasing -- student loan
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 9:00pm EST
guess the flex pay did not hurt? >>caller: absolutely not because i took the vantage of that. >>host: mr too. >>caller: -- >>caller: =e too. >>caller: it took for ever to try to get hers. >>host: this is for mom, >>caller: yes. >>host: i am so glad you got it before it sells out. . >>caller: is the kindle case still available? >>host: do we have red and orange available? >>caller: do you have the black? >>host: this is a different version with either the mock croc or the solid black. we have the black, orange and the red. >>caller: cannot -- black>>host: kudos to you for getting it for yourself and this get the case because it is more durable than plastic and you can take on the road and this is a sexy case.in the black for everyone and i like the mock croc. i love my and it actually has the mock croc even on the molded (...) >>guest: on the bumpers and that is really nice. >>host: from edge to edge it looks c13 an expensive wallet. we are wildly and you have to take advantage of it now because basically when is gone, it is gone and free shipping and handling and one thing that diane men
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 8:00pm EST
the democratic republic of congo. and that's my friend and colleague for her opening. >> thank you, mr. chair and thank you for your leadership on this issue in holding this important hearing. while this committee held a hearing on the drc not too long ago, recent event in eastern congo motivated closer examination of this current crisis. i want to especially thank assistant secretary ambassador carson and other witnesses are offering testimony to today's hearing. i would like to commend many of you sitting in the audience for your tireless work towards peace and justice for those affected by the past and current crisis. the concerns have been heard and the committee will elevate the status of drc supersedes the international attention needed to bring about lasting peace and stability. myself, members of the committee and colleagues in the senate are deeply concerned with omicron reports of human rights violations, recruitment of child soldiers and the involvement of drc's been eastern region. which is just scraping for the international community to work on common interest towards
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 5:00pm EST
say, "no." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the h
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 5:00pm EST
clinton has accepted them all and good for her. and she has of course appointed a new person mr. nides and i know that's you and you are really going to look at this. i am very very happy that you are going to leave this task force. but you know congress has its obligations too and we have to put our money where our mouth is and we are going to want to make sure that our diplomats are secure and we have to pony up the money. you know it's very easy and you hear rumblings in the conference -- congress about cutting back and lets cut let's cut foreign aid and let's cut foreign security. it's very easy to say that. we have pressing problems here, who cares about what happens overseas? i have heard people say that. that shouldn't he. we need to care and that is what we are doing. let me say this. according to the crs, congress has underfunded state department diplomatic security by $600 million under the request over the last three years. the house funding level was closer to three-quarters of a billion dollars below that. the aarp observe funding restrictions have led the state to be reso
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 6:00am EST
will concede, just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i also thank her for 15 years, having union station, a true intermodal center, used to have people come to the greyhound station, drag their luggage to union station, we used to go around town to take a bus, and some satellite location and 15 months we have got that done and dedicated, came up for that during a very heated election but i thank you for your leadership. not this secretary but deputy secretary was instrumental in thanking the nation's capital having a true intermodal, like most of you. >> i want to thank our witnesses for being with us and i want to thank secretary ray lahood. it is your birthday. i would not have chosen to spend my birthday with you but glad you have chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion -- a week and half ago to go to new york, bless amtrak forever, even on the assumption, and i do share your view, we have a densely populated corridor in the northeast, that requires no bust development of high-speed rail, and i d
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 7:30am EST
that nurse he has announced today he is cutting her job seekers' allowance for the next three years. how can that be fair when he's cutting the top rate -- [inaudible] how can that be fair, mr. speaker, when someone earning 228,000 pounds a year will get a top rate tax cut of 75 pounds a week in april which is more than the 71 pounds the nurse gets to live on in -- [inaudible] mr. speaker? and i have to say what we've learned today is not just hitting those looking for work, the majority of people who lose from his cuts to tax credits are people in work. millions of families strifing hard -- striving hard to do the right thing, mr. speaker. what kind of government believes you can only make low-paid working people work harder by cutting their tax credits, but you only make millionaires work harder by cutting their taxes, mr. speaker? i tell you, that's not a one nation government, mr. speaker. they must really believe if you cut taxes at the top, the wealth will trickle down. let me remind the house what the chancellor said to the conservative party conference in october 2009. he sa
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 5:15pm EST
to the distinguished ranking member -- the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair. this being probably the last opportunity i will have to do this, but to thank her again for the extraordinary partnership we have had for more than a decade now on the homeland security and governmental affairs committee, and it's really meaningful to me that we have this last opportunity to do something together across party lines that we believe and hope will be in our national interests. i thank the chair, and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from maine is recognized. ms. collins: thank you, mr. president. mr. president, i'm pleased to join the chairman of the homeland security committee, senator joe lieberman, in submitting for the congressional record our investigative report on the terrorist attack against the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya, that claimed the lives of four americans who were serving our country. this report is indeed the last initiative that the chairman and i will produce together. it is the final work product
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 12:00am EST
ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a different experience. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was latin -- mexico-american. my mother was european-american so that kind of created a very tense -- sort of other complicated household, and they had a lot of children r
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 8:00am EST
totally beguiling. and her husband, who was the head of the national intelligence, comes in and says, oh, mr. jefferson, i'm sorry i'm late. and margaret bayard smith's head explodes because she just found him to be the most gracious man she'd ever metment -- met. he could disarm you that way. there is something poetic in the fact that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly because he was so articulate and so prolific. 20,000 or more letters, brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquent. so what can we make of him? this is, this ises the man, the human being
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
barack senior during the period, before he graduated and left, only one person can remember her at all. the others constantly never saw. so \mr.{-|}\mister, what was that? she left. >> how long was she in seattle? >> guest: about a year and a half it as a single mother with, yes, and she had babysitters and she went to school part-time. got herself back together. that first semester at university of wide was the difficult because she got pregnant. so she had to sort of reveal herself on academically, and she did at the university of hawaii. and after barack, sr. had left hawaii to go to harvard, she and little barrie came back. >> host: 1962-19 safety seven they were back in honolulu. who was her second husband? >> guest: her second husband was another international guy. he was in indonesia. she met him at the university of hawaii. he was from the east-west center. brought americans the honolulu to prepare to go to asia for study. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did the move to jakarta? >> guest: he went back firs
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 5:00pm EST
. mr. cardin: let me thank senator shaheen for her leadership on this issue. we've had many discussions about how to advance human rights issues and what is the best strategy to get the sergei magnitsky bill enacted into law. your leadership on the senate foreign relations committee on europe, your leadership in the helsinki commission, you've been one of the real champions on this issue. i just want to thank you, want to thank you for your good advice and for allowing us to be able to get us to this day. i'm convinced tomorrow the senate will pass this legislation. the president is going to sign it, and we will have achieved a great victory for human rights. i thank you. i think also your observations as we were talking about how to move forward with this bill in connection with pntr for russia and as senator lieberman talked about a little bit earlier, i am convinced as important as this bill was, that the magnitsky bill by itself would have been extremely difficult for us to get through for the president and for the president to sign and to become law and that combining i
CSPAN
Dec 21, 2012 6:00am EST
gratitude to you and to dr. volkow for her leadership, director control kousky and his new deputy directer, mr. leibowitz, thank you all for being leaders, and a special thanks to dr. johnston because monitoring the future is a treasure for public health, so it's a great pleasure for me to be here. in examining the results that are being unveiled today, we should remember that of all these agents, that tobacco remains the leading cause of premature and preventable death in the united states. smoking kills more than 1200 americans every day, and for every tobacco-related death there are two new replacement cigarette smokers under the age of 26. it's tragic that these replacement smokers are kids who start when they are not fully ready to make an informed choice. and, indeed, you have heard -- and it is true -- that tobacco addiction is a pediatric disease. three out of fourteens who smoke continue to smoke into adulthood, even though they intend to quit, and a typical smoker loses 13-14 years of precious life. so today we announce that cigarette use among youth is dropping and that
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